Data visualization in the media: Interesting video

A colleague who knows my fascination with data visualization pointed me to a recent interesting video created by Geoff McGhee on Journalism in the Age of Data. In this 8-part video, he interviews media people who create visualizations for their websites at the New York Times, Washington Post, CNBC, and more. It is interesting to see their view of why interactive visualization might be useful to their audience, and how it is linked to “good journalism”. Also interviewed are a few visualization interface developers (e.g., IBM’s Many Eyes designers) as well as Infographics experts and participants at the major Inforgraphics … Continue reading Data visualization in the media: Interesting video

ASA’s magazine: Excel’s default charts

Being in Bhutan this year, I have requested the American Statistical Association (ASA) and INFORMS to mail the magazines that come with my membership to Bhutan. Although I can access the magazines online, I greatly enjoy receiving the issues by mail (even if a month late) and leafing through them leisurely. Not to mention the ability to share them with local colleagues who are seeing these magazines for the first time! Now to the data-analytic reason for my post: The main article in the August 2010 issue of AMSTAT News (the ASA’s magazine) on Fellow Award: Revisited (Again) presented an “update to … Continue reading ASA’s magazine: Excel’s default charts

Creating map charts

With the growing amount of available geographical data, it is useful to be able to visualize one’s data on top of a map. Visualizing numeric and/or categorical information on top of a map is called a map chart. Two student teams in my Fall data mining class explored and displayed their data on map charts: one team compared economic, political, and well-being measures across different countries in the world. By linking a world map to their data, they could use color (hue and shading) to compare countries and geographical areas on those measures. Here’s an example of two maps that … Continue reading Creating map charts

The good, bad and ugly graphs

In his May 2007 newsletter Stephen Few, a data visualization guru with an expertise in business data, created the The Graph Design I.Q. Test. “This brief I.Q. test leads you through a series of 10 questions that ask you to choose which of two graphs presents the data more effectively”. I took it myself (and Stephen is probably tracking my answers!) — it’s very cool and quickly teaches a good lesson in good vs. bad graphics and tables. You will be strongly discouraged after it to abuse color, 3D, etc. If you got hooked, Stephen has a big bag of … Continue reading The good, bad and ugly graphs