Psychology journal bans statistical inference; knocks down server

In its recent editorial, the journal Basic and Applied Social Psychology announced that it will no longer accept papers that use classical statistical inference. No more p-values, t-tests, or even… confidence intervals!  “prior to publication, authors will have to remove all vestiges of the NHSTP (p-values, t-values, F-values, statements about ‘‘significant’’ differences or lack thereof, and so on)… confidence intervals also are banned from BASP” Many statisticians would agree that it is high time to move on from p-values and statistical inference to practical significance, estimation, more elaborate non-parametric modeling, and resampling for avoiding assumption-heavy models. This is especially so now, … Continue reading Psychology journal bans statistical inference; knocks down server

Language and psychological state: explain or predict?

Quite a few of my social science colleagues think that predictive modeling is not a kosher tool for theory building. In our 2011 MISQ paper “Predictive Analytics in Information Systems Research” we argue that predictive modeling has a critical role to play not only in theory testing but also in theory building. How does it work? Here’s an interesting example: The new book The Secret Life of Pronouns by the cognitive psychologist Pennebaker is a fascinating read in many ways. The book describes how analysis of written language can be predictive of psychological state. In particular, the author describes an … Continue reading Language and psychological state: explain or predict?

Discovering moderated relationship in the era of large samples

I am currently visiting the Indian School of Business (ISB) and enjoying their excellent library. As in my student days, I roam the bookshelves and discover books on topics that I know little, some, or a lot. Reading and leafing through a variety of books, especially across different disciplines, gives some serious points for thought. As a statistician I have the urge to see how statistics is taught and used in other disciplines. I discovered an interesting book coming from the psychology literature by Herman Aguinas called Regression Analysis for Categorical Moderators. “Moderators” in statistician language is “interactions”. However, when … Continue reading Discovering moderated relationship in the era of large samples