New curriculum design guidelines by American Statistical Association: Who will teach?

The American Statistical Association published new “Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Programs in Statistical Science“. This is the first update to the guidelines since 2000. The executive summary lists the key points: Increased importance of data science Real applications More diverse models and approaches Ability to communicate This set sounds right on target with what is expected of statisticians in industry (the authors of the report include prominent statisticians in industry). It highlights the current narrow focus of statistics programs as well as their lack of real-world usability.  I found three notable mentions in the descriptions of the above points: Point … Continue reading New curriculum design guidelines by American Statistical Association: Who will teach?

Google Scholar — you’re not alone; Microsoft Academic Search coming up in searches

In searching for a few colleagues’ webpages I noticed a new URL popping up in the search results. It either included the prefix academic.microsoft.com or the IP address 65.54.113.26. I got curious and checked it out to discover Microsoft Academic Search (Beta) — a neat presentation of the author’s research publications and collaborations. In addition to the usual list of publications, there are nice visualizations of publications and citations over time, a network chart of co-authors and citations, and even an Erdos Number graph. The genealogy graph claims that it is based on data mining so “might not be perfect”. All this is … Continue reading Google Scholar — you’re not alone; Microsoft Academic Search coming up in searches

Big Data: The Big Bad Wolf?

“Big Data” is a big buzzword. I bet that sentiment analysis of news coverage, blog posts and other social media sources would show a strong positive sentiment associated with Big Data. What exactly is big data depends on who you ask. Some people talk about lots of measurements (what I call “fat data”), others of huge numbers of records (“long data”), and some talk of both. How much is big? Again, depends who you ask. As a statistician who’s (luckily) strayed into data mining, I initially had the traditional knee-jerk reaction of “just get a good sample and get it … Continue reading Big Data: The Big Bad Wolf?

Data visualization in the media: Interesting video

A colleague who knows my fascination with data visualization pointed me to a recent interesting video created by Geoff McGhee on Journalism in the Age of Data. In this 8-part video, he interviews media people who create visualizations for their websites at the New York Times, Washington Post, CNBC, and more. It is interesting to see their view of why interactive visualization might be useful to their audience, and how it is linked to “good journalism”. Also interviewed are a few visualization interface developers (e.g., IBM’s Many Eyes designers) as well as Infographics experts and participants at the major Inforgraphics … Continue reading Data visualization in the media: Interesting video

ASA’s magazine: Excel’s default charts

Being in Bhutan this year, I have requested the American Statistical Association (ASA) and INFORMS to mail the magazines that come with my membership to Bhutan. Although I can access the magazines online, I greatly enjoy receiving the issues by mail (even if a month late) and leafing through them leisurely. Not to mention the ability to share them with local colleagues who are seeing these magazines for the first time! Now to the data-analytic reason for my post: The main article in the August 2010 issue of AMSTAT News (the ASA’s magazine) on Fellow Award: Revisited (Again) presented an “update to … Continue reading ASA’s magazine: Excel’s default charts

Google purchases data visualization tool

Once again, some hot news from my ex-student Adi Gadwale: Google recently purchased a data visualization tool from Professor Hans Rosling at Stockholm’s Karolinska Institute (read the story). Adi also sent me the link to Gapminder, the tool that Google has put out.http://tools.google.com/gapminder. For those of us who’ve become addicts of the interactive visualization tool Spotfire, this looks pretty familiar! Continue reading Google purchases data visualization tool